POSITIVE THINKING: Kickin old age…(19)

2014-11-28_11h10_27

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING, SENIORS | Leave a comment

POSITIVE THINKING: THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

Week in a Wink has been replaced by Thought for the Day

01 thorns and roses

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING | Leave a comment

POSITIVE THINKING: Kickin old age…(18)

2014-11-28_11h08_39

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING, SENIORS | Leave a comment

MISC: HAND WRITTEN NOTES MAKERS BEAT OUT DIGITAL NOTE MAKERS

2015-01-21_16h01_32

Click HERE to automatically see WHY HANDWRITTEN NOTEMAKES OUTPERFORM DIGITAL NOTEMAKERS hands down

Read why hand writing notemakers outperform notemakers who use computers, laptops, etc.

However, for manipulating, editing, managing, organizing, and sharing information, digital works best.

Posted in MISC | Leave a comment

POSITIVE THINKING: Kickin old age…(17)

2014-11-28_11h05_02

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING, SENIORS | Leave a comment

Richard's Reviews: CHIEFS by Stuart Woods

2015-01-14_14h22_52

An OUTSTANDING read, unequivocally!

Dear Mr. Woods,

Your detective novels are adult male comic books: lively, entertaining and occasionally even esoteric as a reader plays super sleuth trying to discover who is the “butler” of this novel’s crime.

I have only read four of your works, three of which I label as forgettable, books perfectly suited for a sandy Caribbean beach.

“Chiefs” on the other hand, is a literary gem, a near masterpiece in my opinion. The development of the story over nearly 50 years is masterful, displaying creative expertise comparable to the very best of crime writers. A reader familiar with your other works might miss your renowned protagonists, Stone Barrington and Holly Barker, but Chiefs is not a novel of that ilk. It is a story of racism and bigotry, of class and social stratification, of family bonds and professional responsibility. This novel must have set the bar for your future ones, set so high with this masterful work, that I seriously doubt you could write a better book.

“Chiefs” has magnetism, on the one hand holding the reader’s attention with an inescapable grasp, on the other, the chiefs trilogy allows readers suitable mental pauses avoiding any onset of boredom. A simply ploy that works well.

Your ads will be inserted here by

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

Each of your lead characters, Will Henry Lee, Sonny Butts, or Tucker Watts, lives by clear principles and values. The reader inevitably cheers for two of the characters, jeers at the other. Will Henry is untrained and totally inexperienced in police work but his life as a caring family man spills over to his professional work where he soon earns the respect and trust of his community. Crimes committed near his rural Georgian community become the priness’ pea under his mental mattress, obstacles to any peace of mind for this policeman. His demise, such a surpise, such a sad ending to so strong of an opening segment.

Next up, Sonny Butts, increasingly more abhorrent with each well written page. We dislike him as a law enforcement officer, but you set the hook with Sonny’s discovery, uncovered somewhat by the first chief. Sonny is a polarization of opposites: his inner core, an authentic police officer; his outer shell, an unscrupulous racist and amoral womanizer. Sonny almost redeems himself to every reader as he follows up his suspicions. Then he too is abruptly removed from the story.

Critics may suggest that the plot twists and turns are too simple, too obvious, too predictable. They miss your novel’s intent. It isn’t a simple mystery novel, a piece for readers to play the guessing game of “Who done it?” This book is a socio-cultural portrait of the southern United States a half century ago, a region of overt and blatant racism, prevalent and deeply embedded everywhere in the ‘Old South.” The novel’s initial setting is the early seventies United States where bigotry and prejudice ruled the day. American society has barely inched the socio-democratic bar a notch toward real equality today, nearly fifty years later. Every night, the television news confirms we have scarcely eked past where we were then. American society is still colour blind, as are many other countries politically, economically and socially dominated by whites. Your book artistically captures a verbal portrait of that anachronistic and unacceptable society and era.

Many readers undoubtedly celebrate the hiring of Tucker Watts, the last of your law enforcing trio. The cell scene with Tucker and the drunken Pieback was captivating. Some critics may be justified in reviewing that final segment as requiring super mental agility and very strong powers of recall to keep the story straight and the plot clear. This is like counting angels on the head of a pin, quibbling, Mr. Woods. The count matters not; the existence of the angels matters. Your novel captures that essence, it has the soul, it is a whole chorus of angels.

Eight years in the writing, incredible that dedication. Other writers show similar commitment to their art, Donna Tartt, “The Secret History,” a prime example, ten years in the works. However sir, I do not compare you to her. I would compare you to another well-known American writer, Harper Lee (To Kill A Mockingbird). She too wrote about the hatred and bigotry in the American south. Her work has been recognized as the first literary masterpiece in the portrayal of American racism. Your work should be viewed as the second.

I recognize that I am talking about a book that was written more than thirty years ago, but your characters, your story and your portrait of American social solidification is timeless.

Congratulations !

Posted in Richard's Reviews | Leave a comment

POSITIVE THINKING: Kickin old age…(15)

2014-11-28_11h01_23

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING, SENIORS | Leave a comment

POSITIVE THINKING: Kickin old age…(14)

2014-11-28_10h58_47

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING, SENIORS | Leave a comment

CURRENT READ: Stuart Woods Series

2015-01-08_10h19_33  2015-01-08_10h20_49  2015-01-08_10h36_00

Adult comic books for men. I may sound sexist, but from my experience, men usually read detective novels more than women. Women seem to prefer romance, historical fiction such as written by Ken Follett (Pillars of Giants, Edge of Eternity).

Stuart Woods writes detective novels, well enough to earn him New York Times Best Seller status. Quibble over whether it is deserved or not is irrelevant. He sells. That is enough.

I have read three of his books at the recommendation of one of my local public library staff who knows my tastes in reading. She was correct in pointing in Woods’ direction. He writes entertainingly. There is no depth, no real character development, nothing that would be labelled as cerebral, so to speak. However, his books entertain the way a comic book entertained when we were kids. It is light reading, quick, no brain teasing clues to solve, though I challenge you to pick the culprit out early depending on the book.

Woods churns out these ‘chef d’oeuvres’ as if he were making toast. I think he might even write them faster than I can read them. That isn’t a criticism. Instead, I stand in awe as to how he can do it so quickly. I suppose if you get into a pattern, you just flow with the work and it isn’t as difficult to do as a non-writer might think. I also think that as he writes one work, he jots down spin off ideas for his next work. In fact, the work that he is currently writing likely becomes the seed for the next. It’s almost like an assembly line. But who cares? At least, he doesn’t, I am sure. He just wants the satisfaction of getting something published and earning a steady income.

However, as much as I may sound as if I am criticizing Woods’ works for being linked sausages on the assembly line, I enjoy reading him. His stories move along at a steady and quick pace, his characters are engaging, his plots are plausible and his dialogues are appropriate and attention getting. I like him.

If you are a fan of detective mysteries and going on a beach holiday for a couple of weeks, bring along 3 or 4, maybe even 5, Woods novels. You’ll love ‘em!

Posted in CURRENT READ, REVIEWS (books) | Leave a comment

POSITIVE THINKING: Kickin old age…(13)

2014-11-28_10h56_54

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING, SENIORS | Leave a comment

ABBA ISSUES (Tech information): JANUARY WORKSHOP

2015-01-05_11h39_51

Posted in ABBA ISSUES (Tech information), CLUBS, TECH | Leave a comment

POSITIVE THINKING: Kickin old age…(12)

2014-11-28_10h54_06

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING, SENIORS | Leave a comment

CLUBS: Season Greetings from Fermo !

2015-01-01_18h00_20

Posted in CLUBS, MISC, Pett Crk BOOK CLUB | Leave a comment

POSITIVE THINKING: Kickin old age…(11)

2014-11-28_10h51_51

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING, SENIORS | Leave a comment

POSITIVE THINKING: Kickin old age…(10)

2014-11-28_10h49_35

Posted in POSITIVE THINKING, SENIORS | Leave a comment